Lindsey Chapman

"I like the fact that I have a very eclectic family. I have a very modern family. My whole stepfamily is Greek, so I have this huge Greek family. It’s great because I grew up with this small unit that got really big once my dad remarried. And my mom used to date a Jamaican man, he lived in Jamaica and we lived there over the summer—which is something that is crazy to a lot of people because I’m this pale, blonde, blue-eyed girl that runs around that used to have a Jamaican stepdad.

“I’m optimistic because I have a lot going on with family troubles and everything but I am a peacemaker and I always try to find that happy ground to go on and find the good and the bad—which is awesome because a lot of people get caught up on very small complications in their lives because they don’t realize that someone else has a much larger battle. Driven, because I’m only 22 but I feel like I’ve accomplishments of a much older person which is pretty cool. Fun loving because a lot of people take themselves too seriously, especially in the workplace. I like to think of it as ‘if you’re here, you should love your job.’

“Before you let go, remember why you held on. A lot of people lose their passion and you kind of need to remember your values and remember what you’re passionate about in order to be true to yourself.

“It’s funny. I’ve gotten, ‘You look so familiar’ and I tell people, ‘Yeah. I know. I’m Brittany from Glee.’ I am a total Gleek. I embrace being Brittany S. Pierce, like I love it. I think she is my favorite character on the show. It’s great because she’s hilarious and I like to pretend that I’m hilarious.

“My spirit animal is Brittany S. Pierce. I love French bulldogs.”

Kirsta Paul
“My name’s Kirsta and I’m originally from Seattle and I moved to Boston four years ago. I’m a teacher and I love this city. I teach kindergarten. Well— elementary school. Next year I’m going to be teaching second grade. [I got into teaching because] I was working with children all the time, like through college and then after college so I decided to get my Master’s in Teaching at Northeastern which brought me to Boston. I always thought Boston would be a fun city to live in and it’s so full of culture and diversity and history and so I started looking at schools over here. My parents also met out here and they’re both from Washington State so that kind of inspired me to be out here.
“I’m a dancer. I worked in Tokyo Disneyland for 7 months when I was 19. I [dressed up as] Alice and Wendy. It was really fun and neat experience. It was funny, one of my friends, Kelly, once said when we were in the dressing room and there was a little bit of drama, ‘Come on people. We are dressing up as a bunch of cartoons. This is not something to get dramatic about. Our life is so easy.’ It was just a funny scenario to be dressed as a cartoon and to run around and sign autographs all day and perform in parades.

“I’m actually going to be moving soon and so I have been just thinking about like just kind of trusting that things work out for the best and that things will work out just how they should work out. I’m definitely a person of faith and so relying on God to guide me in all of my decisions and really listening and being still and not impulsive.“
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Kirsta Paul

“My name’s Kirsta and I’m originally from Seattle and I moved to Boston four years ago. I’m a teacher and I love this city. I teach kindergarten. Well— elementary school. Next year I’m going to be teaching second grade. [I got into teaching because] I was working with children all the time, like through college and then after college so I decided to get my Master’s in Teaching at Northeastern which brought me to Boston. I always thought Boston would be a fun city to live in and it’s so full of culture and diversity and history and so I started looking at schools over here. My parents also met out here and they’re both from Washington State so that kind of inspired me to be out here.

“I’m a dancer. I worked in Tokyo Disneyland for 7 months when I was 19. I [dressed up as] Alice and Wendy. It was really fun and neat experience. It was funny, one of my friends, Kelly, once said when we were in the dressing room and there was a little bit of drama, ‘Come on people. We are dressing up as a bunch of cartoons. This is not something to get dramatic about. Our life is so easy.’ It was just a funny scenario to be dressed as a cartoon and to run around and sign autographs all day and perform in parades.

“I’m actually going to be moving soon and so I have been just thinking about like just kind of trusting that things work out for the best and that things will work out just how they should work out. I’m definitely a person of faith and so relying on God to guide me in all of my decisions and really listening and being still and not impulsive.“

Caroline Senn
“Summer fashion— I wear a lot of shorts. Shorts are easier, because I run around a lot or I’m on the floor. [My sense of fashion] is kind of preppy. I get a lot of my clothes from the LOFT. I like shorts. I like gold sandals and gold belts. I wear a lot of the same jewelry over and over again but I do have a lot of bangles. The only thing, I really change up are my bangles. I feel different when I wear different jewelry and I don’t really feel like myself.
“My dad is really awesome. He sends me these really weird things. One of the things, I have on my desk. It said something like, ‘Sometimes you just need a cracker. You never know when a cracker could change your worldview,’ or something goofy like that. The whole point of that is sometimes you need to relax and have a snack, and you’re going to feel better. Yeah, he sends me weird things. He sends me obituaries of great women. It sounds really, really morbid but it’s not. He said [in the email], ‘One of the great women that came before you. Championing women’s economic rights and then some, so that all and all of your gender and generation can be all that you can be.” He’s just funny like that.
“[One thing] that I’ve learned is you can’t judge your insides on other people’s outsides. For all of my friends that were kind of getting engaged and getting married, you know people that are getting their masters or moving to great cities and seem to have these great stories. It doesn’t mean that they’re that happy on the inside. Their life might look great from the outside, so I can’t go ‘I wish I had that’ or ‘Why am I not that way?’ because you don’t actually know what their life is actually like.”
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Caroline Senn

“Summer fashion— I wear a lot of shorts. Shorts are easier, because I run around a lot or I’m on the floor. [My sense of fashion] is kind of preppy. I get a lot of my clothes from the LOFT. I like shorts. I like gold sandals and gold belts. I wear a lot of the same jewelry over and over again but I do have a lot of bangles. The only thing, I really change up are my bangles. I feel different when I wear different jewelry and I don’t really feel like myself.

“My dad is really awesome. He sends me these really weird things. One of the things, I have on my desk. It said something like, ‘Sometimes you just need a cracker. You never know when a cracker could change your worldview,’ or something goofy like that. The whole point of that is sometimes you need to relax and have a snack, and you’re going to feel better. Yeah, he sends me weird things. He sends me obituaries of great women. It sounds really, really morbid but it’s not. He said [in the email], ‘One of the great women that came before you. Championing women’s economic rights and then some, so that all and all of your gender and generation can be all that you can be.” He’s just funny like that.

“[One thing] that I’ve learned is you can’t judge your insides on other people’s outsides. For all of my friends that were kind of getting engaged and getting married, you know people that are getting their masters or moving to great cities and seem to have these great stories. It doesn’t mean that they’re that happy on the inside. Their life might look great from the outside, so I can’t go ‘I wish I had that’ or ‘Why am I not that way?’ because you don’t actually know what their life is actually like.”

Nico Brown
“I’m from Salem, Massachusetts. I just graduated from Salem State University in May. I studied Criminal Justice while I was there. I would like to eventually pursue a career in law enforcement but lately it has kind of been a bit of a waiting game to get into that line of work. There are a lot that you need to go through even once you’re out of college. So I’ve just been doing that stuff and hoping to break into the field soon.
“I’m really interested in sports. Like hockey. I follow all of the Boston teams really. In high school I also ran track and I was really fast. Like a set a bunch of records and won many awards. But now I don’t really run now so I’m a bit out of shape and not as fast.

“I believe in karma. Like if you do good things then good things will be repaid to you. For example if you help out your friends then they will be more willing to return the favor. So you should just always do the right thing no matter what and in the end you’ll receive the good in return.” 
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Nico Brown

“I’m from Salem, Massachusetts. I just graduated from Salem State University in May. I studied Criminal Justice while I was there. I would like to eventually pursue a career in law enforcement but lately it has kind of been a bit of a waiting game to get into that line of work. There are a lot that you need to go through even once you’re out of college. So I’ve just been doing that stuff and hoping to break into the field soon.

“I’m really interested in sports. Like hockey. I follow all of the Boston teams really. In high school I also ran track and I was really fast. Like a set a bunch of records and won many awards. But now I don’t really run now so I’m a bit out of shape and not as fast.

“I believe in karma. Like if you do good things then good things will be repaid to you. For example if you help out your friends then they will be more willing to return the favor. So you should just always do the right thing no matter what and in the end you’ll receive the good in return.” 

Michael Coughlin
“This is a pedi-cab. I give people rides around the city and I give tours. [I got into this because] I like riding bikes and I thought it would be a great way to work out and train for races. I get paid to work out now. It’s pretty sweet.
“I also went down and pedi-cabbed for the inauguration in D.C. So I flew down for that and pedi-cabbed for that. I got to watch all the preparation. It was crazy. It was just like a big event in Boston but instead of the Boston police they were guards with the FBI with M16s. It was like the inauguration for the president, not like Mayor Menino riding his bike somewhere.
“This is my sixth summer [doing this]. [When I’m not doing this] I lie to children. I mean, I teach middle school science outside of Boston. I come from a family of teachers and didn’t care for doing engineering. I’ve been teaching for about four years. It’s awesome.

“It’s better to ask for forgiveness than for permission. I don’t really like asking if I’m allowed to do something. I just like to say, ‘Oops I’m sorry’ when it’s all done. People are always hesitant about doing things. Just do it and deal with the consequence.”
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Michael Coughlin

“This is a pedi-cab. I give people rides around the city and I give tours. [I got into this because] I like riding bikes and I thought it would be a great way to work out and train for races. I get paid to work out now. It’s pretty sweet.

“I also went down and pedi-cabbed for the inauguration in D.C. So I flew down for that and pedi-cabbed for that. I got to watch all the preparation. It was crazy. It was just like a big event in Boston but instead of the Boston police they were guards with the FBI with M16s. It was like the inauguration for the president, not like Mayor Menino riding his bike somewhere.

“This is my sixth summer [doing this]. [When I’m not doing this] I lie to children. I mean, I teach middle school science outside of Boston. I come from a family of teachers and didn’t care for doing engineering. I’ve been teaching for about four years. It’s awesome.

“It’s better to ask for forgiveness than for permission. I don’t really like asking if I’m allowed to do something. I just like to say, ‘Oops I’m sorry’ when it’s all done. People are always hesitant about doing things. Just do it and deal with the consequence.”

Cece Wedel
“So I think something that’s pretty important in my life is that I’m actually from Denmark. I was born there and move to America when I was six years old. So even though I’ve grown up here I think when I’m in America I feel Danish still because I’m different than everyone else but when I’m home in Denmark then I definitely feel American because I’m different from those people. That’s something that people don’t know really know right off the bat because I don’t really have an accent and I look like everyone else, so it’s not a dead giveaway.
“Everything is heavily taxed in Denmark, so a car is like three, or four times more expensive there as it is here.  It is much more middle class there. You pay like 65% in taxes so everyone just has a comfortable middle class lifestyle. So like a doctor isn’t living a much more glamorous life than a garbage collector. It like a lot more even. But I think it also takes away incentive a little bit to work hard because there is a ceiling on what you can achieve and here there is no limit.
“I think following your instinct is the best thing you can do. A lot of times, I don’t always follow this advice, but I’ll spend a lot of time over analyzing my decisions and I feel like I’ll ultimately end up coming back to what was my initial instinct. I think you just need to learn to trust yourself, like you to where you are in your life for a reason and that’s usually like your intelligence and instinct in things. So to trust your gut is what I’ve been trying to do more. It makes you more confident.”
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Cece Wedel

“So I think something that’s pretty important in my life is that I’m actually from Denmark. I was born there and move to America when I was six years old. So even though I’ve grown up here I think when I’m in America I feel Danish still because I’m different than everyone else but when I’m home in Denmark then I definitely feel American because I’m different from those people. That’s something that people don’t know really know right off the bat because I don’t really have an accent and I look like everyone else, so it’s not a dead giveaway.

“Everything is heavily taxed in Denmark, so a car is like three, or four times more expensive there as it is here.  It is much more middle class there. You pay like 65% in taxes so everyone just has a comfortable middle class lifestyle. So like a doctor isn’t living a much more glamorous life than a garbage collector. It like a lot more even. But I think it also takes away incentive a little bit to work hard because there is a ceiling on what you can achieve and here there is no limit.

“I think following your instinct is the best thing you can do. A lot of times, I don’t always follow this advice, but I’ll spend a lot of time over analyzing my decisions and I feel like I’ll ultimately end up coming back to what was my initial instinct. I think you just need to learn to trust yourself, like you to where you are in your life for a reason and that’s usually like your intelligence and instinct in things. So to trust your gut is what I’ve been trying to do more. It makes you more confident.”

Tim Cawley
"I am Tim Cawley, and I’m a writer/creative director at Mullen. I have worked at ad agencies in Boston, Minneapolis and Chicago. I’m [also] a drummer, and somewhat decent guitar player, and less than somewhat decent singer.”I started as a drummer, and one day my singer didn’t show up for band practice in Freshman year. And I said, well I’ll try and sing from behind the drums, and I did that for a while. And then I took a job when I was 25 at Carmichael Lynch, and it was in winter in Minneapolis, and I didn’t know anybody in Minnesota. And I said ‘I’ll just accept the fact that I’m gonna have no social life for six months…and I’ve always wanted to play guitar. So I’ll use this social downtime of being alone in my apartment, and I’ll learn to play guitar.’ So I started this art project called ‘The Days’ and I counted the number of days I played guitar, and I learned to play guitar out in the clubs. So like my first concert ever was ‘The 213 Days Show’ and I only knew like maybe ten songs that were really easy, but people came out. And then we had ‘The 280-whatever Days Show’ and it was a little bit better. And it started to get a following and people started to come out and be part of the band. And then I made the ‘776 Days’ album where I like wrote my own songs, these simple songs, and then it grew from that. But then the days got too high, and I should have been better than I was. You know, if it’s like 6000 days and you’re still not awesome… So then I said ‘I’ll just call the whole thing ‘Pretty Good,” and that’s what it’s called now."So the film I think is pertinent to anybody who would be your audience because it’s about how you think stuff up. I had made two short films that played festivals around the world. I wrote and directed them. And they were fiction films, and I was thinking like ‘Geez, I’d really like to make a feature film while I’m young and have a lot of energy.’ And I was like I’ve written all these scripts and was having trouble getting the money. And I was like ‘I’ll just make a documentary’ and I’m like ‘But what should it be about?’ And I kinda thought about how difficult it was to actually like make a film. And I’m like ‘Well why don’t I just make a film about how hard it is to make stuff?’ And that’s what it was born out: of my creative curiosity of how people’s brains work. And I was having a conversation with my dad who’s a chemical sales person, and he was saying that he was putting together this deal for some complicated chemical deal, and he’s like ‘It’s what you do with your films and your advertising and your music.’ And I’m like ‘Woah, woah.’ But then he was like ‘No, you know I had to conceive it, I had to sell it through, I have to keep idiots from screwing it up.’"You know, there’s kind of like some similarities here. So that’s what I did, I interviewed cancer scientists, and comedians, and chefs, and songwriters, and artists…fifteen different disciplines, all creative. Some were obvious, you know like painter. Some less obvious like a scientist. And it’s fun for me to see you cut from how a cancer scientist solves a problem to a comedian and they’re talking about the exact same thing. Or a chef, and a political cartoonist."It was fun to just be around these people. And they were curious about advertising and that sort of stuff. So yeah, I made this film, and it’s played in festivals around the world. It’s been a fantastic adventure. We screened at the Cleveland film festival, and we were doing two theaters simultaneously of 800 seats, completely sold out, side by side. It was like mind blowing. Because it starts out and you go, ‘Can I even make a film?’ ‘I’ll get like a couple people together’ and it was like when you’re little and you go into the woods with your video camera and you’re trying to make like the Blair Witch Project or something. That’s how I’ve felt this whole time, and then all of a sudden like a thousand people show up in a theater to see it."So that was really amazing…And now I think it’ll be out by the end of the year, like on iTunes and Netflix and all that.Below you can watch the trailer for Tim’s documentary “From Nothing, Something.” Also look for it on Netflix and iTunes soon!
Zoom Info

Tim Cawley

"I am Tim Cawley, and I’m a writer/creative director at Mullen. I have worked at ad agencies in Boston, Minneapolis and Chicago. I’m [also] a drummer, and somewhat decent guitar player, and less than somewhat decent singer.

I started as a drummer, and one day my singer didn’t show up for band practice in Freshman year. And I said, well I’ll try and sing from behind the drums, and I did that for a while. And then I took a job when I was 25 at Carmichael Lynch, and it was in winter in Minneapolis, and I didn’t know anybody in Minnesota. And I said ‘I’ll just accept the fact that I’m gonna have no social life for six months…and I’ve always wanted to play guitar. So I’ll use this social downtime of being alone in my apartment, and I’ll learn to play guitar.’ So I started this art project called ‘The Days’ and I counted the number of days I played guitar, and I learned to play guitar out in the clubs. So like my first concert ever was ‘The 213 Days Show’ and I only knew like maybe ten songs that were really easy, but people came out. And then we had ‘The 280-whatever Days Show’ and it was a little bit better. And it started to get a following and people started to come out and be part of the band. And then I made the ‘776 Days’ album where I like wrote my own songs, these simple songs, and then it grew from that. But then the days got too high, and I should have been better than I was. You know, if it’s like 6000 days and you’re still not awesome… So then I said ‘I’ll just call the whole thing ‘Pretty Good,” and that’s what it’s called now.

"So the film I think is pertinent to anybody who would be your audience because it’s about how you think stuff up. I had made two short films that played festivals around the world. I wrote and directed them. And they were fiction films, and I was thinking like ‘Geez, I’d really like to make a feature film while I’m young and have a lot of energy.’ And I was like I’ve written all these scripts and was having trouble getting the money. And I was like ‘I’ll just make a documentary’ and I’m like ‘But what should it be about?’ And I kinda thought about how difficult it was to actually like make a film. And I’m like ‘Well why don’t I just make a film about how hard it is to make stuff?’ And that’s what it was born out: of my creative curiosity of how people’s brains work. And I was having a conversation with my dad who’s a chemical sales person, and he was saying that he was putting together this deal for some complicated chemical deal, and he’s like ‘It’s what you do with your films and your advertising and your music.’ And I’m like ‘Woah, woah.’ But then he was like ‘No, you know I had to conceive it, I had to sell it through, I have to keep idiots from screwing it up.’

"You know, there’s kind of like some similarities here. So that’s what I did, I interviewed cancer scientists, and comedians, and chefs, and songwriters, and artists…fifteen different disciplines, all creative. Some were obvious, you know like painter. Some less obvious like a scientist. And it’s fun for me to see you cut from how a cancer scientist solves a problem to a comedian and they’re talking about the exact same thing. Or a chef, and a political cartoonist.

"It was fun to just be around these people. And they were curious about advertising and that sort of stuff. So yeah, I made this film, and it’s played in festivals around the world. It’s been a fantastic adventure. We screened at the Cleveland film festival, and we were doing two theaters simultaneously of 800 seats, completely sold out, side by side. It was like mind blowing. Because it starts out and you go, ‘Can I even make a film?’ ‘I’ll get like a couple people together’ and it was like when you’re little and you go into the woods with your video camera and you’re trying to make like the Blair Witch Project or something. That’s how I’ve felt this whole time, and then all of a sudden like a thousand people show up in a theater to see it.

"So that was really amazing…And now I think it’ll be out by the end of the year, like on iTunes and Netflix and all that.

Below you can watch the trailer for Tim’s documentary “From Nothing, Something.” Also look for it on Netflix and iTunes soon!

Adam Nelsen

“I did a photo-shoot with the most beautiful hearse that you have ever seen. It’s a chopped up (Cadillac) XTS, which is a high end vehicle that you would come from the airport in if you were a high dollar executive—but they reformat and refit those to be hearses as well, so it was awesome. It had the most amazing interior. It was guarded with people with guns on the photo-shoot because it’s an exclusive, private shrouded vehicle. They were scanning the horizon for people with cameras. It was kind of ridiculous but it’s a beautiful car. Shooting a hearse was awesome, not many people have a hearse in their book.

“My wife and I like to go to estate sales and buy old stuff. I started to focus on ties because ties were interesting and cheap. Then one day, when I got this job [at Mullen]. So it’s a really big place and I only work with a small group of people. So I said, “What’s a way that I can make my personality stand out a little bit?” So then all of a sudden one day I just said, “I’m wearing my ties!” And then I started buying them, buying more and more. And then Instagram came out.  I started looking at hash tags of menswear and ties. I realized that there are a ton of people who do the same thing, who are interested in the same thing. So I just started taking pictures of that stuff. I started taking pictures of stuff like that and I got a lot of attention from menswear people and just met friends online, Insta-friends.

“I have a more classic style. I’m not going to dip that much into what’s trending in a season. So I have around 450 ties now and a bunch of shirts to match them with and some other fun type accessories. It’s all pretty cheap stuff. I buy pretty much all my stuff used or secondhand, so I can go kind of crazy with quantity.”

Check out his sense of style here on Instagram.

Phuong Diep
“I really just emphasize the fact that I don’t like cheese. Even my good friends forget about it and it pisses me off so much.
“I’m of a Vietnamese background, I’ve pretty much lived here all my life but I wasn’t born here. I was born in the Philippines, even though I’m full Vietnamese. I was about a month old when I came here. I’ve never been to the Phillipines, but I’ve been back to Vietnam when I was about 8 or so. It’s been a long time.
“It’s always raining [in Vietnam]. It literally floods up to your waist. It gets really bad. And it’s always hot and humid over there. The food is amazing. I have these really crazy memories of Vietnam, which I’ll never ever forget.
“I did like it there. I have a bunch of family over there. I have cousins that I need more than 2 hands to count. It was just really heartwarming to be back, just because all of my family was super welcoming. I definitely want to go back. It’s my mom’s wish, pretty much. She said that after I graduate she wants to move back to Vietnam.
“Push yourself to do whatever makes you happy. I was never truly happy living by [my family’s] standards. When I went into communications as my major, it really made me happy and opened a lot of doors for me. You have to definitely go for what you want to do and what will make you happy in the long run. I can’t imagine what it’s like to not do what you want to do.”
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Phuong Diep

“I really just emphasize the fact that I don’t like cheese. Even my good friends forget about it and it pisses me off so much.

“I’m of a Vietnamese background, I’ve pretty much lived here all my life but I wasn’t born here. I was born in the Philippines, even though I’m full Vietnamese. I was about a month old when I came here. I’ve never been to the Phillipines, but I’ve been back to Vietnam when I was about 8 or so. It’s been a long time.

“It’s always raining [in Vietnam]. It literally floods up to your waist. It gets really bad. And it’s always hot and humid over there. The food is amazing. I have these really crazy memories of Vietnam, which I’ll never ever forget.

“I did like it there. I have a bunch of family over there. I have cousins that I need more than 2 hands to count. It was just really heartwarming to be back, just because all of my family was super welcoming. I definitely want to go back. It’s my mom’s wish, pretty much. She said that after I graduate she wants to move back to Vietnam.

“Push yourself to do whatever makes you happy. I was never truly happy living by [my family’s] standards. When I went into communications as my major, it really made me happy and opened a lot of doors for me. You have to definitely go for what you want to do and what will make you happy in the long run. I can’t imagine what it’s like to not do what you want to do.”

Matthew Grayly
“My hobby is basketball. [I’ve been playing] since I was about 8. My father was a big basketball player. He played at Baylor University, so I kind of got into that. I just love watching basketball. [My favorite part of basketball] is probably the action. It’s just so fast-paced and it’s consistency. In every other sport you have to wait to see something happen, in basketball you just make it happen.
“I study sports management. Sports are all around my life. In high school I played football and basketball. I played soccer when I was little.

“My grandma always tells me to just go for it. Whatever I want to do, just go for it. You ain’t gonna do anything by just sitting on your ass. Pretty much that. Keep going forward. Never stop.”
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Matthew Grayly

“My hobby is basketball. [I’ve been playing] since I was about 8. My father was a big basketball player. He played at Baylor University, so I kind of got into that. I just love watching basketball. [My favorite part of basketball] is probably the action. It’s just so fast-paced and it’s consistency. In every other sport you have to wait to see something happen, in basketball you just make it happen.

“I study sports management. Sports are all around my life. In high school I played football and basketball. I played soccer when I was little.

“My grandma always tells me to just go for it. Whatever I want to do, just go for it. You ain’t gonna do anything by just sitting on your ass. Pretty much that. Keep going forward. Never stop.”

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